entrepreneur, Inspirational, learning, Motivational, Uncategorized

Loneliness and just how to put it to your advantage

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What is the most important thing in people’s life that makes them joyful? Some persons may point to tremendous prominence and riches but to most, friends and family are the tangible central source of happiness. Even though our need to bond is inborn, the truth is that many of us will every now and then go home alone. You could have people around you during the course of the day or even be in a lifelong partnership and still experience a profound, persistent loneliness. After food and shelter, our need to belong and feel positively connected to others is arguably the Number One predictor of well-being,

Loneliness can therefore be defined as sadness caused by one having no friends or company to connect to. Loneliness is a complex and usually unpleasant emotional response to separation or lack of companionship. Loneliness typically includes anxious feelings about a lack of connection or communication with other beings, both in the present and extending into the future. As such, loneliness can be felt even when surrounded by other people. The causes of loneliness are varied and include social, mental, emotional or even physical factors.

Loneliness can be found throughout societies among people in marriages, relationships, families normally consequence of breakups or divorces, or loss of any important person in one’s life. Loneliness may represent a dysfunction of communication and can also result from places with low population density where there are few people to interact with.Loneliness is therefore, a subjective experience; if a person thinks they are lonely, then they are lonely. People can be lonely while in solitude, or in the middle of a crowd. What makes a person lonely is the fact that they need more social interaction or a certain type of social interaction that is not currently available. A person can be in the middle of a party and feel lonely due to not talking to enough people. Conversely, one can be alone and not feel lonely; even though there is no one around, that person is not lonely because there is no desire for social interaction. There have also been suggestions that each person has their own sweet spot of social interaction. If a person gets too little or too much social interaction, this could lead to feelings of loneliness or if one gets too much it could lead to over stimulation.

Solitude can have positive effects on individuals. It can help to improve their intellectual state such as improving attentiveness. Furthermore, once the alone time is over, people’s moods tended to increase significantly.Loneliness can also play an important role in the creative process. In some people, temporary or prolonged loneliness can lead to notable inventive and creative expression,

Causes of Loneliness

Social isolation refers to an objective state in which we have limited social connections and interactions. Loneliness, on the other hand, is an entirely subjective state, in which we feel socially and/or emotionally disconnected from those around us. As such, socially isolated people are not necessarily lonely, and lonely people are not necessarily socially isolated.Loneliness tends to create distorted perceptions and pessimistic mind-sets that can lead to depression. Being lonely makes us judge our friendships and relationships more negatively and respond to others more defensively and even with greater hostility—which can push people away and sabotage opportunities for closeness and meaningful interaction. Thus, these behaviors can set us up for being both more socially isolated and more depressed. The good news is that regardless of whether we are genetically predisposed to loneliness, according to observation by Guy Winch, ‘’the power to extract ourselves from its clutches remains in our hands’. Doing so involves correcting our negative perceptions of our relationships, by assuming people care for us more than we believe they do and giving them the benefit of the doubt and taking active steps to reach out and connect with others no matter emotionally risky it feels to do so. Then   monitoring our reactions to limit defensiveness and hostility and make efforts to come across more warmly and openly.

Introversion

Fear and depression and are common among introverts than extroverts this means that introvert are more susceptible to become loners.Introverts are more self-deprecating than others—but also more accurate in their self-assessments they seem to have cheerless practicality.Cheerfulness, an arousing emotion, may be distracting for introverts during tasks. By difference, extroverts tend to feel cheerful or animated while approaching or concluding their tasks. Conversation between an introvert and an extroverts can involve a series of misunderstandings. As the introvert struggles to follow multiple conversational threads and sort out his own thoughts, he remains quiet and appears to be just listening. The extrovert reads that as engagement, a cue to keep talking. The introvert struggles with the continuing flow of input and soon starts to shut out the extrovert, while nodding or smiling, or even trying to stop the exchange.

What Not to Say to an Introvert

Introverts, those quiet creatures that walk among you, are not as mild-mannered as made out to be. They seethe and even will lash out at those who encroach upon or malign their personal comfort zones. Here are a few emotional buttons to avoid with your introverted companions.

  • Don’t demand immediate feedback from an introvert as they  need time to formulate them and often won’t talk until a thought is suitably polished.
  • Don’t ask introverts why they’re not contributing in meetings. If you’re holding a brainstorming session, let the introvert prepare, or encourage him to follow-up with his contributions afterward.
  • Don’t interrupt if an introvert does get to talking. Listen closely as being  overlooked is a really big issue for introverts,” Trying to connect in the virtual sphere, though, is actually counterproductive. Here are three ways virtual connection is ruining your real-life relationships:

Excessive connection to Social media what do you do on social media? You share moments—moments of joy, of friendship, humor and beauty. Paradoxically, by engaging with social media all the time , you lose the moment. In your quest to connect virtually, you disconnect from your reality and the people in it.

You lose the experience of happiness in the process of trying to refine your smile for public consumption.  The need for positive reinforcement through likes and comments will keep you detached.We’re happiest when our mind is in the present moment, not when it’s wandering off somewhere. Truly savoring a positive experience—fully immersing yourself in it—enhances the experience and the happiness you derive from it. As soon as you pull out that Selfie stick, you’ve lost itInstead of deriving pleasure from your experience—say, travel—your device becomes your main source of pleasure. Unwittingly, it makes you less connected and more narcissistic, and with that comes a roller coaster of emotional highs and lows caused by obsessive attention-seeking.

One study found that the mere presence of a cell phone while two people are talking interferes with their feelings of closeness, connection, and communication. We are profoundly social creatures wired to connect with others; when devices interfere with your conversations, you undermine your own ability to connect with others. You miss the sparkle of emotion in your child’s eye, the look of vexation on your partner’s face, or a friend’s attempt to share something meaningful with you. In theory, social media is designed to connect us. In reality, it acts as a barrier.

 

 

References

 

Guy Winch, https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-squeaky-wheel/201612/is-there-gene-loneliness

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loneliness

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